Home arrow Bible Studies arrow Economic Justice Bible Study Questions arrow PARABLE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN
Home
Articles
Bible Studies
PARABLE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 14 May 2005

A Bible Lesson on Economic Justice for Small Discussion Groups

By Jim Jordal

  1. CONTENT, TO BE READ ALOUD AND REFERRED TO AS DISCUSSION PROGRESSES:

And behold, a certain lawyer stood and put Him to the test, saying, "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" And He said to him, "What is written in the law? How does it read to you?" And he answered and said, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself." And He said to him, "You have answered correctly; do this and you will live." But wishing to justify himself, he said to Jesus, "And who is my neighbor?"

Jesus replied and said, "A certain man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho; and he fell among robbers, and they stripped him and beat him, and went off leaving him half dead. And by chance a certain priest was going down on that road, and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. And likewise a Levite also, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a certain Samaritan, who was on a journey, came upon him; and when he saw him, he felt compassion, and came to him, and bandaged up his wounds, pouring oil and wine upon them; and he put him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And on the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper and said, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, when I return, I will repay you.’

Luke 10:25-35 (NASB)

  1. BACKGROUND OF THE PARABLE:

The lawyer Jesus spoke with was a scribe, or person supposedly familiar enough with the Law of Moses to be able to interpret and apply it. Jesus used this parable to point out to him, as well as the disciples, that religious tradition did not necessarily imply compassion for others. Samaritans lived north of Jerusalem, and were descendants of Israelites and Assyrians brought in to replace Israelites taken in the captivities. As such they were a mixed race hated and shunned by devout Jews. The road to Jericho was a rocky, dangerous trail descending 3300 feet in 17 miles, often beset by bandits.

C. QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION:

  1. Were the lawyer's questions in good faith? What was he attempting to do?
  2. What was the prevailing attitude of devout Jews at that time toward sinners and Gentiles?
  3. What evidently blinded the two religious leaders from feeling compassion for the wounded traveler?.
  4. What groups in society today could be represented by the wounded, suffering man?
  5. What messages does this parable transmit by the statement that both priest and Levite passed by the injured, suffering man without offering aid?
  6. Why do you think the Samaritan was able to find compassion when others could not? (See James 2:1-9 and 14-22 to help with your answer).
  7. What is the message taught by the fact that the wounded man finally found aid from a hated and shunned Samaritan?
  8. What levels of care (charity, support, advocacy) did the Samaritan give to the injured man?
  9. What does this parable say to you and your church today?
  1. PRINCIPLES FOR CONSIDERATION
  2. :
  1. Religious orthodoxy and tradition is no guarantee of compassion or economic justice.
  2. Knowing the words of Scripture does not mean that we comprehend and apply its message.
  3. Economic justice is acceptable to God no matter who applies it.
  4. Prejudice and discrimination often blind us to the needs of others.
  5. True love of God and neighbor requires us to aid the needy, exploited, and oppressed.
  1. REFERENCES:

Lev. 19:18; Deut. 6:5; Gal. 3:10-13, 22-25; Ps. 139:21-22.

Last Updated ( Friday, 20 January 2006 )